Elementary Worldly Wisdom – Part 3

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April 18, 2014
Munger 1

The following is Part 3 of portfolio management highlighted extracted from a gem of a Munger speech given at USC nearly a decade ago. It’s long, but contains insights collected over many years by one of the greatest investment minds in this century. Caustically humorous (purely Munger), it is absolutely worth 20 minutes of your [...]

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Elementary Worldly Wisdom – Part 2

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April 12, 2014
Munger 1

The following is Part 2 of portfolio management highlights extracted from a gem of a Munger speech given at USC 20 years ago in 1994. It’s long, but contains insights collected over many years by one of the world’s greatest investment minds. Caustically humorous, purely Munger, it is absolutely worth 20 minutes of your day [...]

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Elementary Worldly Wisdom – Part 1

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April 8, 2014
Munger 1

The following are portfolio management highlights extracted from a gem of a Munger speech given at USC 20 years ago in 1994. It’s long, but contains insights collected over many years by one of the world’s greatest investment minds. Caustically humorous, purely Munger, it is absolutely worth 20 minutes of your day between browsing ESPN [...]

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Mauboussin: Frequency vs. Magnitude

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March 17, 2014
Mauboussin

Our last article on the uncontrollable nature of luck was just downright depressing. To lift spirits & morale, this article showcases more comforting content on factors that are within an investor’s control. The following excerpts are extracted from a piece by Michael Mauboussin written in 2002 titled The Babe Ruth Effect – Frequency versus Magnitude. [...]

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Howard Marks’ Book: Chapter 16

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March 11, 2014
Marks Book

Continuation of portfolio management highlights from Howard Marks’ book, The Most Important Thing: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor, Chapter 16 “The Most Important Thing Is…Appreciating the Role of Luck.” Luck, Capital Preservation “We have to practice defensive investing, since many of the outcomes are likely to go against us. It’s more important to ensure [...]

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A Chapter from Swensen’s Book

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February 27, 2014
Swensen

Given his reputation and the title of the book, we would be remiss not to feature excerpts from David Swensen’s Pioneering Portfolio Management. Below are portfolio construction & management highlights from Chapter 6: Portfolio Management. The manager anecdotes in this chapter are fairly interesting too, providing readers a window into how an institution (Yale/Swensen) evaluates its [...]

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Wisdom From James Montier

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February 1, 2014
Montier Note 2

I have a confession to make: I have a huge crush on James Montier. I think the feeling might be mutual (see picture below, from a signed copy of his book Value Investing: Tools and Techniques for Intelligent Investment.) Jokes aside, below are some fantastic bits from his recent essay titled “No Silver Bullets.”     [...]

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Klarman’s Margin of Safety: Ch.13 – Part 3

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January 13, 2014
Klarman 3

This is a continuation in our series of portfolio construction & management highlights extracted from Seth Klarman’s Margin of Safety. In Chapter 13 (Portfolio Management and Trading) - Part 3 below, Klarman shares his thoughts on a number of portfolio construction and management topics such as risk management, hedging, and correlation. Portfolio Management, Risk “The challenge of successfully managing an [...]

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Klarman’s Margin of Safety: Ch.13 – Part 2

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January 8, 2014
Klarman 3

This is a continuation in our series of portfolio construction & management highlights extracted from Seth Klarman’s Margin of Safety. In Chapter 13 (Portfolio Management and Trading) - Part 2 below, Klarman shares his thoughts on the illusory nature of liquidity, and the tricky task of knowing when to sell. Liquidity, Catalyst, When To Buy, When To [...]

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Klarman’s Margin of Safety: Ch.13 – Part 1

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December 28, 2013
Klarman 3

Many years ago, Seth Klarman wrote a book titled “Margin of Safety: Risk-Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor.” It is now out of print, and copies sell for thousands on eBay, etc. This marks our first installment of portfolio construction & management highlights extracted from this book. We begin this series not with [...]

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Waiting For The Next Train

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December 18, 2013
Train

Following up our recent article on selectivity standards in an upward moving market, below are some comforting words (and/or coping advice) from Mariko Gordon of Daruma Capital derived from her October 2013 Newsletter. “My ruminations on regret are of the bull market variety. Whereas bear markets make me regret owning every single stock in the [...]

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How Selective Is Too Selective?

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December 14, 2013
Selectivity

A very smart friend and I were trading emails recently (comparing notes on a particularly hairy investment) and our conversation veered toward the issue of selectivity in an increasingly expensive and upward moving market. We reminisced about the good ol’ days (2008-2010) when fairly good businesses would trade at 5x FCF, or banks with clean [...]

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Asymmetry Revisited

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November 22, 2013
Asymmetry

Return asymmetry is a topic that emerges over and over again on PM Jar. It’s a topic that spans across investments strategies and philosophies (see the end of this article for links to previous PM Jar articles on return asymmetry). This is no coincidence – creating (positive) return asymmetry over time is the hallmark of [...]

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Howard Marks’ Book: Chapter 15

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November 10, 2013
Marks Book

Continuation of portfolio management highlights from Howard Marks’ book, The Most Important Thing: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor, Chapter 15 “The Most Important Thing Is…Having a Sense for Where We Stand.” Cash, Risk, Opportunity Cost “The period from 2004 through the middle of 2007 presented investors with one of the greatest opportunities to outperform [...]

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An Anecdotal Gem

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October 23, 2013
Gem

The following anecdote comes from WkndNotes by Eric Peters (a treasure trove of humor and investment insight) and touches upon Tesla. Our readers know that PM Jar does not discuss ideas, and we have no intention of jumping into the Tesla debate or to declare ourselves Musk-lovers. The reason why we are showcasing this excerpt is because [...]

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Baupost Letters: 1999

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October 9, 2013
Klarman 2

Continuation in our series on portfolio management and Seth Klarman, with ideas extracted from old Baupost Group letters. Our Readers know that we generally provide excerpts along with commentary for each topic. However, at the request of Baupost, we will not be providing any excerpts, only our interpretive summaries, for this series. Sizing, Catalyst, Expected [...]

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Bob Rodriguez’s Diversification Experiment

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September 22, 2013
Bob Rodriquez 2

Below are some portfolio management highlights from a recent interview (July 2013) with Bob Rodriguez and Dennis Bryan of First Pacific Advisors in Value Investor Insight. Especially intriguing is Bob’s description of his ongoing experiment related to the effects of diversification on portfolio returns. Diversification, Sizing, Volatility “Your portfolio today has fewer than 30 positions. [...]

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Howard Marks’ Book: Chapter 14

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August 27, 2013
Marks Book

Continuation of portfolio management highlights from Howard Marks’ book, The Most Important Thing: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor, Chapter 14 “The Most Important Thing Is…Knowing What You Don’t Know” Mistakes, Sizing, Diversification, Leverage, Opportunity Cost “…the biggest problems tend to arise when investors forget about the difference between probability and outcome – that is, when [...]

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Embracing Chaos & Randomness

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August 17, 2013
Random

Investing is hard on the psyche. Events don’t always make sense, yet external pressures often demand that you make sense of everything seemingly random. This can lead to frustration stemming from cognitive dissonance – the discomfort experienced when simultaneously holding two or more conflicting ideas, beliefs, values or emotional reactions. Perhaps this is why I enjoyed reading [...]

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AUM’s Impact On Performance

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July 28, 2013
Change Ahead

People often remark that “AUM is the enemy of performance.” But is this truly always the case? Here’s another thought-provoking excerpt from Stephen Duneier of Bija Capital Management that explores the nuances of the AUM-Performance relationship. AUM, Expected Return, Sizing, Selectivity, Liquidity “Since becoming a portfolio manager more than ten years ago, I have managed [...]

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